Drug vs. Drug

Latuda vs Seroquel: Main Differences and Similarities

By | June 25, 2019

Latuda (lurasidone) and Seroquel (quetiapine) are two psychotropic medications that treat schizophrenia and bipolar episodes. Latuda treats depressive episodes while Seroquel treats depressive and manic episodes of bipolar I disorder. Both drugs are believed to work on dopamine and serotonin receptors in the brain. Despite their similarities, Latuda and Seroquel have some differences in how they are used.

Latuda

Latuda is the brand name for lurasidone hydrochloride. It was approved in 2010 to treat schizophrenia in adults and adolescents aged 13 to 17 years old. Latuda can also treat bipolar depression alone or with other therapies.

Latuda is available in oral tablets with strengths of 20 mg, 40 mg, 60 mg, 80 mg and 120 mg. It is usually taken once daily. Latuda needs to be taken with meals of at least 350 calories for sufficient absorption in the body.

Seroquel

Seroquel is known by its generic name quetiapine fumarate. It was approved in 1997 to treat schizophrenia in adults and adolescents aged 13 to 17 years old. Seroquel also treats bipolar mania and depression.

Seroquel is available as a 25 mg, 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 300 mg, and 400 mg oral tablet. It also comes in extended-release forms. Seroquel is usually taken twice daily with or without food.

Latuda vs Seroquel Side by Side Comparison

Latuda and Seroquel are similar medications for psychiatric conditions. Their similarities and differences can be reviewed in the table below.

Latuda Seroquel
Prescribed For
  • Schizophrenia
  • Bipolar disorder (depressive episodes)
  • Schizophrenia
  • Bipolar disorder (manic and depressive episodes)
Drug Classification
  • Antipsychotic
  • Antipsychotic
Manufacturer
Common Side Effects
  • Somnolence
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Akathisia (restless movements)
  • Weight gain
  • Insomnia
  • Diarrhea
  • Anxiety
  • Increased glucose levels
  • Increased lipid levels
  • Weight gain
  • Somnolence
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Constipation
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Stomach ache
  • Indigestion
  • Dizziness
  • Dry mouth
  • Increased liver enzymes
  • Fast heart beat
  • Pharyngitis
Is there a generic?
  • There is currently no generic version available
Is it covered by insurance?
  • Varies according to your provider
  • Varies according to your provider
Dosage Forms
  • Oral tablet
  • Oral tablet
  • Oral tablet, extended release
Average Cash Price
  • $1,389 for a supply of 30, 40 mg tablets
  • $231 for 30 tablets (50 mg)
SingleCare Discount Price
Drug Interactions
  • CYP3A4 inhibitors (erythromycin, clarithromycin, fluconazole, ketoconazole, ritonavir, diltiazem, verapamil, etc.)
  • CYP3A4 inducers (rifampin, phenytoin, carbamazepine, St. John’s wort, bosentan, etravirine, modafinil, efavirenz, etc.)
  • Antihypertensives
  • CYP3A4 inhibitors (erythromycin, clarithromycin, fluconazole, ketoconazole, ritonavir, diltiazem, verapamil, etc.)
  • CYP3A4 inducers (rifampin, phenytoin, carbamazepine, St. John’s wort, bosentan, etravirine, modafinil, efavirenz, etc.)
  • Antihypertensives
Can I use while planning pregnancy, pregnant, or breastfeeding?
  • Latuda is in Pregnancy Category B. No fetal harm was demonstrated in animal studies. However, adequate trials have not been done in humans. Consult a physician regarding steps to take if pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Seroquel is in Pregnancy Category C. Animal studies have shown adverse effects to the fetus. Adequate studies have not been performed in humans. Consult a doctor regarding steps to take while pregnant and breastfeeding.

Summary

Latuda (lurasidone) and Seroquel (quetiapine) are similar antipsychotic medications that treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Latuda can treat bipolar depression while Seroquel can treat both bipolar depression and bipolar mania.

Latuda must be taken with food for adequate absorption in the body. It is usually taken once daily. Seroquel is often taken with or without food twice daily. Extended-release Seroquel can be taken once daily.

Both Latuda and Seroquel have similar side effects such as somnolence and nausea. While weight gain has been reported for both drugs, Latuda may have less weight-gain side effects compared to Seroquel. Latuda also has less drug interactions compared to Seroquel.

Discuss these medications with your doctor. Depending on your condition and medical history, one medication may be preferred over the other. The information here is provided as a brief overview of two different medications.